Philadelphia Eagles News

Jaws: Offseason Critical To Vick's Development

Former Philadelphia Eagles quarterback and current Monday Night Football analyst Ron Jaworski spent some time Tuesday morning on ESPN's Mike and Mike In The Morning to discuss how important the offseason is in the development of a young quarterback.

Now, most people would not classify Michael Vick as a young quarterback. He is 30 years old and turns 31 later this summer.

But as a quarterback there is still plenty of room for growth even after his career-best 2010 season. At the conclusion of last year, Vick talked to reporters about how much he had grown as a player because he now knew how to play the position. Think about it. Vick only started getting the first-team reps after the regular season had started. Imagine an entire offseason where Vick would work with the starters.

"I've always been a firm believe quarterbacks improve the most in the offseason because they are not worried about gameplanning. They are not worried about their opponent," Jaworski said. "Coaches are working with them on the individual mechanics. They're working with their wide receivers getting the hint, the indicator, the feel for each other."

However, the ability for the Eagles to work with Vick could be hampered by a potential work stoppage. Jaworski is no stranger to this. He was a part of the 1982 and 1987 seasons that were shortened by players' strikes and strongly believes the 1982 version "destroyed" an Eagles team that made the playoffs in four straight years.

Vick and Jaworski will likely talk shop this Friday night at the 74th Annual Maxwell Football Club Awards Dinner at Harrah's Resort in Atlantic City, N.J. Vick is being honored as the NFL's player of the year. Andy Reid is also being recognized as the NFL's coach of the year. Jaworski is the president of the Maxwell Football Club. The event is open to the public and a limited amount of tickets are still available by calling 215-643-3833 or going to MaxwellFootballClub.org.

-- Posted by Chris McPherson, 12:30 p.m., March 1

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