The Official Site of the Philadelphia Eagles

Coaches

Print
RSS
Frank Reich
Offensive Coordinator

Biography

Frank Reich was hired by Eagles head coach Doug Pederson in the 2016 offseason and boasts 25 seasons of NFL experience as both a player (1985-1998) and a coach (2006-2016).

Reich comes to Philadelphia from San Diego, where he spent the last two years as the team’s offensive coordinator after coaching the Chargers’ quarterbacks in 2013.

In San Diego, Reich worked closely with Chargers QB Philip Rivers and helped the 12-year veteran achieve one of the best stretches of his career. While under Reich’s supervision, Rivers hit the 4,000-yard passing plateau in three-straight seasons for a total of 13,556 yards, marking the third-most passing yards by an NFL quarterback during that span. Also during that span, Rivers threw 92 touchdowns, the fourth-highest total in the NFL, while compiling the third-most completions in the league (1,194) and recording the second-highest completion percentage (67.3).

During Reich’s two seasons as San Diego’s offensive coordinator, the Chargers ranked third in completions (822), fourth in completion percentage (66.2) and fifth in the NFL in net passing yards (8,869).

In 2015, Reich’s second year as San Diego’s offensive coordinator, Rivers led the league with a career-high and franchise-record 437 completions, while finishing second in the NFL with a career-high 4,792 passing yards. Reich’s impact was immediately evident in his first season as the team’s offensive coordinator (2014), as Rivers became the first QB since 1960 to record a QB rating of at least 120 in five-consecutive games, all of which were Chargers wins.

Reich was initially hired by the Chargers in 2013 and the former quarterback’s work with Rivers was evident in his first season as quarterbacks coach. In his first year working with Reich, Rivers led the NFL with a career-high 69.5 completion percentage, while he also matched his career-high 105.5 quarterback rating, which ranked fourth in the league that season. Rivers’ 4,478 passing yards in 2013 marked his third-highest single-season total at the time and his 32 touchdown passes still rank as the second-highest total of his career.

Prior to his tenure in San Diego, Reich coached wide receivers for the Arizona Cardinals in 2012, where he worked with WRs Larry Fitzgerald and Michael Floyd.

In 2011, Reich served as the wide receivers coach for the Indianapolis Colts. Future Hall of Fame QB Peyton Manning missed all of that season due to injury and despite playing with three different starting quarterbacks, Reich’s two top wideouts, Pro Bowler Reggie Wayne and Pierre Garcon, were just one of two wide receiver duos in the NFL to each record 70-plus receptions and 900-plus receiving yards.

Reich entered the NFL coaching world in 2006 as a coaching intern with the Colts. After two seasons, Reich was promoted to offensive assistant and one year later he was promoted to quarterbacks coach. In that role from 2009-10, he worked with Manning, who recorded 9,200 passing yards in his final two seasons with Indianapolis, including a then-career-high 4,700 yards in 2010. In 2009, Reich’s first season as Indy’s quarterbacks coach, Manning was named the NFL MVP after he completed 393 of his 571 passing attempts for 4,500 yards and 33 touchdowns. Manning’s 68.8 completion percentage that season marked a new career high for the signal caller.

A former third-round draft choice of the Buffalo Bills in the 1985 NFL Draft, Reich enjoyed a 14-year playing career with the Bills, Carolina Panthers, New York Jets and Detroit Lions. A backup for the majority of his time in the NFL, Reich played in 129 games with 22 starts, including playoffs, and completed 575-of-1,036 passes for 6,858 yards and 47 touchdowns during his career.

Reich spent the first 10 years of his NFL career with the Bills, where he served as a backup to Hall of Fame QB Jim Kelly. During his time in Buffalo, Reich was a part of Bills teams that went to four-straight Super Bowls from 1990-1993, appeared in five AFC Championship Games and captured five division titles.

While Reich was rarely pressed into action during his nine years backing up Kelly, the former signal caller was called upon in the 1992 playoffs after Kelly sprained his right knee in the regular-season finale and was forced to sit out the first two rounds. Despite having only attempted one pass in a postseason game prior to the 1992 season, Reich made his first postseason start in the 1992 Wild Card round and engineered the greatest comeback in NFL history. With the Bills trailing the Houston Oilers by 32 points early in the third quarter, Reich orchestrated five second-half touchdown drives, four of which were capped by touchdown passes, and led a game-winning field goal drive in overtime to defeat Houston 41-38. Reich started the next week in a Divisional Round win at Pittsburgh and the Bills went on to make an appearance in Super Bowl XXVII.

A native of Freeport, NY, Reich attended Cedar Crest H.S. in Lebanon, PA. He played collegiately at the University of Maryland from 1981-84 where he backed up Boomer Esiason before earning the starting job as a senior in 1984. As a senior, Reich rallied the Terrapins from a 31-0 deficit to defeat the Miami Hurricanes, 42-40. At the time, Maryland’s victory over Miami marked the greatest comeback win in college football history and is now only second to Michigan State’s 2006 35-point comeback over Northwestern.

Reich graduated from Maryland in 1984 with a business degree and earned Academic All-ACC honors as a senior.

He and his wife, Linda, have three children.

Frank Reich was hired by Eagles head coach Doug Pederson in the 2016 offseason and boasts 25 seasons of NFL experience as both a player (1985-1998) and a coach (2006-2016).

Reich comes to Philadelphia from San Diego, where he spent the last two years as the team’s offensive coordinator after coaching the Chargers’ quarterbacks in 2013.

In San Diego, Reich worked closely with Chargers QB Philip Rivers and helped the 12-year veteran achieve one of the best stretches of his career. While under Reich’s supervision, Rivers hit the 4,000-yard passing plateau in three-straight seasons for a total of 13,556 yards, marking the third-most passing yards by an NFL quarterback during that span. Also during that span, Rivers threw 92 touchdowns, the fourth-highest total in the NFL, while compiling the third-most completions in the league (1,194) and recording the second-highest completion percentage (67.3).

During Reich’s two seasons as San Diego’s offensive coordinator, the Chargers ranked third in completions (822), fourth in completion percentage (66.2) and fifth in the NFL in net passing yards (8,869).

In 2015, Reich’s second year as San Diego’s offensive coordinator, Rivers led the league with a career-high and franchise-record 437 completions, while finishing second in the NFL with a career-high 4,792 passing yards. Reich’s impact was immediately evident in his first season as the team’s offensive coordinator (2014), as Rivers became the first QB since 1960 to record a QB rating of at least 120 in five-consecutive games, all of which were Chargers wins.

Reich was initially hired by the Chargers in 2013 and the former quarterback’s work with Rivers was evident in his first season as quarterbacks coach. In his first year working with Reich, Rivers led the NFL with a career-high 69.5 completion percentage, while he also matched his career-high 105.5 quarterback rating, which ranked fourth in the league that season. Rivers’ 4,478 passing yards in 2013 marked his third-highest single-season total at the time and his 32 touchdown passes still rank as the second-highest total of his career.

Prior to his tenure in San Diego, Reich coached wide receivers for the Arizona Cardinals in 2012, where he worked with WRs Larry Fitzgerald and Michael Floyd.

In 2011, Reich served as the wide receivers coach for the Indianapolis Colts. Future Hall of Fame QB Peyton Manning missed all of that season due to injury and despite playing with three different starting quarterbacks, Reich’s two top wideouts, Pro Bowler Reggie Wayne and Pierre Garcon, were just one of two wide receiver duos in the NFL to each record 70-plus receptions and 900-plus receiving yards.

Reich entered the NFL coaching world in 2006 as a coaching intern with the Colts. After two seasons, Reich was promoted to offensive assistant and one year later he was promoted to quarterbacks coach. In that role from 2009-10, he worked with Manning, who recorded 9,200 passing yards in his final two seasons with Indianapolis, including a then-career-high 4,700 yards in 2010. In 2009, Reich’s first season as Indy’s quarterbacks coach, Manning was named the NFL MVP after he completed 393 of his 571 passing attempts for 4,500 yards and 33 touchdowns. Manning’s 68.8 completion percentage that season marked a new career high for the signal caller.

A former third-round draft choice of the Buffalo Bills in the 1985 NFL Draft, Reich enjoyed a 14-year playing career with the Bills, Carolina Panthers, New York Jets and Detroit Lions. A backup for the majority of his time in the NFL, Reich played in 129 games with 22 starts, including playoffs, and completed 575-of-1,036 passes for 6,858 yards and 47 touchdowns during his career.

Reich spent the first 10 years of his NFL career with the Bills, where he served as a backup to Hall of Fame QB Jim Kelly. During his time in Buffalo, Reich was a part of Bills teams that went to four-straight Super Bowls from 1990-1993, appeared in five AFC Championship Games and captured five division titles.

While Reich was rarely pressed into action during his nine years backing up Kelly, the former signal caller was called upon in the 1992 playoffs after Kelly sprained his right knee in the regular-season finale and was forced to sit out the first two rounds. Despite having only attempted one pass in a postseason game prior to the 1992 season, Reich made his first postseason start in the 1992 Wild Card round and engineered the greatest comeback in NFL history. With the Bills trailing the Houston Oilers by 32 points early in the third quarter, Reich orchestrated five second-half touchdown drives, four of which were capped by touchdown passes, and led a game-winning field goal drive in overtime to defeat Houston 41-38. Reich started the next week in a Divisional Round win at Pittsburgh and the Bills went on to make an appearance in Super Bowl XXVII.

A native of Freeport, NY, Reich attended Cedar Crest H.S. in Lebanon, PA. He played collegiately at the University of Maryland from 1981-84 where he backed up Boomer Esiason before earning the starting job as a senior in 1984. As a senior, Reich rallied the Terrapins from a 31-0 deficit to defeat the Miami Hurricanes, 42-40. At the time, Maryland’s victory over Miami marked the greatest comeback win in college football history and is now only second to Michigan State’s 2006 35-point comeback over Northwestern.

Reich graduated from Maryland in 1984 with a business degree and earned Academic All-ACC honors as a senior.

He and his wife, Linda, have three children.

 

Related Articles

Recent Videos